A Mix of Mediums: Video Game Adaptations

As the gaming industry grows in popularity and spreads to new demographics, it sometimes merges with other formats of entertainment. If someone can find it entertaining, there is a good chance it can get its own video game adaptation. Movies, comic books, mythology, and even less story based mediums can translate well into video games. For example, board and tabletop games, as well as cards, slots, and other casino style games. Magic the Gathering has an online version of the popular trading card game, and websites like M88 serve as options to play online casino games. And I’m pretty sure we are all familiar with the pinball and solitaire games that were found on just about every pc.

But for less casual options, we find lots of entertainment from the action genre can be and often is converted to games. Comic books and movies especially are adapted into video game counterparts or inspire games with shared characters. The conflict within the action genre allows for exciting gameplay, and comic books and movies both have plots and characters that are well developed. Spiderman, Deadpool, and the Avengers are both examples of this transition. These Marvel heroes are not only pulled from comic books, but their own movies as well.

Comic Books Image

These three mediums especially have a close relationship, as we find the adaptations don’t always flow from movie or comic to video game. Overwatch has its own comics to help flesh out the multiplayer game’s story, and both Heavenly Sword and Assassin’s Creed have movie adaptations.

Even with the (sometimes) very close relationship between games, movies, and comics, is it a healthy one? Should all these different forms of entertainment be getting a video game adaptation?

In the case of tabletop and board games, an online version seems like a great way to play with friends (or strangers) from the comfort of your own home. No longer will you need to schedule game nights and try to arrange meeting places, and the best part: you don’t even have to wear pants. Online casinos offer a similar opportunity. No pants required, comfy sitting, easy gambling. All these casual formats offer a hassle free way to play these games that normally require face to face interaction and a great deal of materials. However, the absence of the human element may be a downside as well, because that social aspect might be just what these online games are missing.

Comic book and movie adaptations run into different issues. A great deal of finesse is required here, as these games have to balance between staying true to the source material and providing a new experience for players. It is not enough to simply be the “game version” of a movie, there must be something unique brought through the process of playing, or it seems like a rather pointless conversion. My favorite examples of these kinds of adaptations are the Lego videogames (Lego Marvel’s Avengers, Lego Star Wars, and Lego Indian Jones) where entire movie plots are condensed into lovely levels to play as Lego versions of your favorite characters. The unique “something” brought in this instance is the whimsical, cartoon rendering.

Video game adaptations from comics, movies, or any other form of entertainment can provide convenience as well as unique experiences not obtainable by the original formats. Do you prefer one over the other? Would you like to see anything turned into a game, or any game turned into something else? Let us know!

Mandi Morris

Farm girl, tomboy, and bookworm. Her heart has a special place for good archery gameplay.

So what do you think?

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